"Dubito, ergo, cogito, cogito ergo sum" [I doubt therefore I think, I think therefore I am] ~René Descartes Dwayne
“ Hierarchical society, after many bloody millennia, has finally reached the culmination of its development. The problems of scarcity, from which emerged propertied forms, classes, the state and all the cultural paraphernalia of domination, can now be resolved by a post-scarcity society. In reaching the point where scarcity can be eliminated, we find that a post-scarcity society is not merely desirable or possible, but absolutely necessary if society is to survive.
Murray Bookchin, American anarchist, libertarian socialist, author, orator, political theoretician, pioneer in the ecology movement, initiated the critical theory of social ecology within anarchist, libertarian socialist, and ecological thought (1921-2006)

posted : Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

“ Material scarcity provided the historic rationale for the development of the patriarchal family, private property, class domination and the state; it nourished the great divisions in hierarchical society that pitted town against country, mind against sensuousness, work against play, individual against society, and, finally, the individual against himself.

Whether this long and tortuous development could have followed a different, more benign, course is now irrelevant. The development is largely behind us. Perhaps like the mythic apple, which, once bitten, had to be consumed completely, hierarchical society had to complete its own bloody journey before its demonic institutions could be exorcised. Be that as it may, our position in that historic drama differs fundamentally from that of anyone in the past.

We of the twentieth century are literally the heirs of human history, the legatees of man’s age-old effort to free himself from drudgery and material insecurity. For the first time in the long succession of centuries, this century —and this one alone—has elevated mankind to an entirely new level of technological achievement and to an entirely new vision of the human experience. We of this century have finally opened the prospect of material abundance for all to enjoy—a sufficiency in the means of life without the need for grinding, day-to-day toil. We have discovered resources, both for man and industry, that were totally unknown a generation ago. We have devised machines that automatically make machines. We have perfected devices that can execute onerous tasks more effectively than the strongest human muscles, that can surpass the industrial skills of the deftest human hands, that can calculate with greater rapidity and precision than the most gifted human minds. Supported by this qualitatively new technology, we can begin to provide food, shelter, garments, and a broad spectrum of luxuries without devouring the precious time of humanity and without dissipating its invaluable reservoir of creative energy in mindless labor. In short, for the first time in history we stand on the threshold of a post-scarcity society.
Murray Bookchin, American anarchist, libertarian socialist, author, orator, political theoretician, pioneer in the ecology movement, initiated the critical theory of social ecology within anarchist, libertarian socialist, and ecological thought (1921-2006)

posted : Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

“ Let us see what was and is the significance of numbers. Any one may see that there are actual differences between such groups as * or as * , * , or as * , * , * , whatever the group was composed of, be it stones, figs, or snakes. And man could not miss for long the peculiar similarity between such a class * * of stones or such a class * * of snakes, etc., and here happened a fact of crucial significance for the future of man. He named those different classes by definite names; good luck saved mankind from his ignorant speculations; he called the class of all such classes as * “one,” the class of all such classes as * * “two,” * * * “three,” etc., and number was born.

Here as everywhere else “le premier pas qui coûte”; number being created the rest followed as a comparatively easy task. Man could not long fail to see that if such a class * is joined to such a class * , he gets such a class * * , but the other day he had called such classes “one” and “two”, and so he concluded that “one and one makes two”—mathematics was born—exact knowledge had begun.

Good luck combined with his human faculties thus helped him to discover one of the eternal truths. The creation of number was the most reasonable, the first truly scientific act done by man; in mathematics this reasonable being produced a perfect abstraction, the first perfect instrument for training his brain, his nerve currents, in the ideal way befitting the actual universe (not a fiction) and himself as a part of the whole.
Alfred Korzybski, Polish-American philosopher, scientist and engineer. Korzybski is remembered for developing the theoretical and practical model of General Semantics. His work argued that human knowledge of the world is limited both by the human nervous system and by the structure of language (1879-1950)

posted : Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

“ No matter where we start, we must start with some undefined words which represent some assumptions or postulates. We see that knowledge at every stage presupposes knowledge of those undefined words. Let us call this fundamental fact the “circularity of knowledge.” Words written or spoken and mathematical symbols are like signs, labels, which we attach to ideas, concepts corresponding to our experience.
Alfred Korzybski, Polish-American philosopher, scientist and engineer. Korzybski is remembered for developing the theoretical and practical model of General Semantics. His work argued that human knowledge of the world is limited both by the human nervous system and by the structure of language (1879-1950)

posted : Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

La Veuve Noire by Pierre-Alain D.

posted : Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013